YINJISPACE use media professional’s unique perspective,try to explore the essence of life behind the design works.

© logo 粤ICP备19077098号

YINJISPACE use media professional’s unique perspective,try to explore the essence of life behind the design works.

© logo 粤ICP备19077098号
Belgium

Axel Vervoordt

A home should be a personal expression of your soul. It should represent the way you want to live, the ideas that define your tastes, perspectives, and connections to the world.

Axel Vervoordt, tall and elegant, with a serene smile, this 62-year-old may be one of the world’s foremost tastemakers. Yet he has little interest in “style,” at least as it is currently defined, because essentially, Vervoordt is a metaphysician. Inquiries into the nature of being and concepts of time and space are what most compel him; he conveys his views through his inspired arrangements of objects and interiors. To some, expressing the lofty in the material might seem contradictory, but Vervoordt believes that, as in a Zen koan, truth can be contained in paradox and ambiguity. Clients may go to him in search of a splendid antique armoire or for help renovating and furnishing an 18th-century villa, but the most valuable service they receive is instruction in his highly evolved yet quite fundamental philosophy of living.

Vervoordt was born in Antwerp in 1947 to a worldly father who made his living trading horses and an equally cultivated mother who thrived on the company of artists and intellectuals. In the early 1960s, she pioneered the conservation of the Vlaeykensgang, Antwerp’s historic old quarter, birthplace of the painters Anthony Van Dyck and Jacob Jordaens. She would buy a building, restore its medieval character, then rent it to artists to enliven the neighborhood. In pursuing these projects, she enlisted the help of her son, who from an early age demonstrated an artistic bent, painting his bedroom windows, for example, to resemble stained glass. These hands-on renovations kindled in Vervoordt a love of the old and authentic and a fascination with the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and the Baroque.

The young Vervoordt got swept up in all his parents’ activities, even their socializing. Their sophisticated friends became his. During this period he developed what would become his trademark practice of purchasing against the prevailing fashion. Vervoordt didn’t consider this avocation a potential profession and went off to university to study economics. He was soon bored, however, and left school to perform his national service in the army. While in the military, he continued buying art and antiques — now for clients as well as himself, sometimes arranging the items in their homes. But it was only when, at age 21, he managed to get $50,000 for a 1948 Magritte painting, La mémoire, for which he’d paid $2,400 that he decided “my passion and my hobby would become my life’s work.”

As important as friendships have been to Vervoordt, none have influenced him as much as those with artists. It was the Belgian painter Jef Verheyen who introduced him to the Zero movement — and to a fresh manner of seeing. “The way one looks at things is of the utmost importance,” Vervoordt recalls him explaining. “You must feel something with your eyes.” The artist also taught him to recognize emptiness as the place where “the essence reveals itself, where nothing means everything.” This aesthetic awakening led Vervoordt to explore Taoism and Zen Buddhism, as well as quantum physics. The philosophy of art and life that emerged from these studies, he calls volledig which translates as “the fullness of emptiness.”

During the early 1970s, Vervoordt began making buying trips to Thailand, Cambodia and Japan. The stillness of the Buddhist art and the serene architectural spaces of the temples resonated deeply with him. He had already been playing with aesthetic polarities in his design dialogues between rustic and Baroque furnishings and between ancient statuary and modern paintings. Now he recognized the potential for creating analogous conversations with Eastern objects. In fact, he found he had a strong affinity for wabi, the Zen notion that true beauty is imperfect, incomplete and impermanent — in other words, as evanescent as life. 

The spaces where people share private experiences with family and friends should restore and give energy. Above all, home is an enlightening space that makes people happy. Often, creating a home means searching for this emotion in every decision that’s made.

Axel Vervoordt create homes that feel as if they’ve always existed. A trademark is the ability to approach every project with a spirit of evolution. Ideas evolve along with their clients. They challenge each other to understand the project and deliver the highest results. It’s this collaboration that creates a friendship and it’s a reason why many of clients are friends for life.

The art of creating value is giving a better place to things. Axel Vervoordt is engaged in a process to help art, objects, furniture, antiques, and their original designs find their true home. Discovery has always been the most important aspect for them.

    Subscribe 订阅

    Design Works

    • Escher House

      Axel Vervoordt create homes that feel as if they’ve always existed. A trademark is the ability to approach every project with a spirit of evolution. Ideas evolve along with their clients. They challenge each other to understand the project and deliver the highest results. It’s this collaboration that creates a friendship and it’s a reason why many of clients are friends for life.
    • Masterpiece

      Axel Vervoordt has turned a 17th-century army barracks into a masterpiece of minimalism. The retreat near bruges, Belgium, was designed for an old friend. An absolute aesthete, Johan Vandendriessche, a Belgian real estate entrepreneur, can love a historic building as easily as a work of art.
    • Keralan House

      Axel Vervoordt designed an extraordinary manor house in kerala, India. The designers came together to create the perfect family home in the kerala landscape. In fact, working with Vervoordt was almost a mental exercise for the client's young family. The house steadies the hero's desire to collect things.
    • Belgian Wabi-Sabi Designer Axel Vervoordt‘ s Home

      In 1989 Axel Vervoordt transformed an old castle from the 16th century into its own office, home and museum. The ancient castle is near the river and has a beautiful garden. The interior is simple, natural and intimate and rustic, which brings people a relaxing and comfortable feeling. He properly presented materials and objects, exposed concrete floors, peeling paint walls, and worn and worn furniture. He said, "I like ancient walls, and as time goes on, they will become like oil paintings."
    • Greenwich Penthouse

      The Greenwich Hotel – TriBeCa Penthouse was created by Belgian designer Axel Vervoordt and Japanese architect Tatsuro Miki, in close collaboration with the hotel’s partners Ira Drukier and Robert De Niro.The 6,800 sq ft suite was inspired by the TriBeCa neighborhood’s industrial past fused with the ancient Japanese aesthetic of Wabi.The Greenwich Hotel – TriBeCa Penthouse design incorporates the philosophical beliefs of Wabi: beauty found in imperfection and authenticity; Artempo – where time becomes art; and poor materials that are rich in spirit.Sustainable design is echoed throughout the interior and exterior space. Materials like stone, steel and reclaimed wood were carefully selected and thoughtfully utilized in every area of the penthouse.“We want to express a tribeca character in the most humble way. because the architecture is so simple, it belongs as much to the past as to the future,” says designer Axel Vervoordt.
    • Covetable Apartment

      Late last year, a new arts destination rose in Belgium. Conceived by Flemish art dealer and interior designer Axel Vervoordt, Kanaal is a cultural and residential complex housed in a converted malting distillery in Wijnegem, a small town a few miles east of Antwerp. Ninety-eight apartments were created throughout five separate buildings designed by local architecture firms, including Bogdan & Van Broeck, Stéphane Beel, and Jens Aerts. One of the largest properties on site is a 2,900-square-foot duplex transformed by the Gent-based office Coussée & Goris, perched on top of the development’s Pakhuizen (‘Warehouses’) with views of the canal.
    • Kanaal

      In 1999, Alex Vervoordt moved to new home known as Kanaal, located in Wijnegem, twenty minutes east of Antwerp. Originally built in 1857, the vast site was a former distillery and malting complex. The existing architecture included brick warehouses and concrete grain silos situated along the banks of the Albert Canal. The Kanaal’s initial development included installing the company’s offices and studios. This was quickly followed by the acquisition of permanent art installations, such as Anish Kapoor’s, At the Edge of the World. A plan was conceived to make Kanaal a cultural and residential center, a process that began in the early 2000s.