YINJISPACE use media professional’s unique perspective,try to explore the essence of life behind the design works.

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YINJISPACE use media professional’s unique perspective,try to explore the essence of life behind the design works.

© logo 粤ICP备19077098号
Italy

Carlo Alberto Scarpa(1906-1978)

If the architecture is any good, a person who looks and listens will feel its good effects without noticing.

Carlo Scarpa (2 June 1906 – 28 November 1978) was an Italian architect, influenced by the materials, landscape, and the history of Venetian culture, and Japan. Scarpa translated his interests in history, regionalism, invention, and the techniques of the artist and craftsman into ingenious glass and furniture design.

An archi­tect who reno­vated exist­ing build­ings, Carlo Scarpa is often called one of the most under­ap­pre­ci­ated modern masters. His aesthetic was defined by an obses­sion with detail, numerol­ogy, and history. Scarpa is best known for his archi­tec­tural works, includ­ing the elegant reno­va­tion of the Museo di Castelvec­chio in Verona, but he also designed furni­ture, such as the award-winning Doge table for Simon/​Gavina.

Born in Venice in 1906, he grad­u­ated from the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Venice and went on to be the direc­tor of Venini Glass­works from 1932 to 1947. It is there that Scarpa’s distinct approach to mate­ri­als and crafts­man­ship began to emerge. His travels to Japan and the influ­ence of other archi­tects he admired — he idol­ized Frank Lloyd Wright — began to inform his work. The strict angular compo­si­tion of his struc­tures was always comple­mented by a spir­i­tual element. No project was alike, and each had a unique history and strong connec­tion to its surround­ings. In 1968, Scarpa took on his final project, a private burial in the Brion Ceme­tery near the Dolomite Moun­tains. The tomb would end up being the architect’s final resting place. 

A master of combining form with material, Scarpa honoured crafts with modern manufacturing processes delivering spaces that balanced old with new, none more so evident than in the renovation of Museo Castelvecchio (1964)  A revelation at the time, today this has become a common approach when renovating original buildings.

Scarpa's style is timeless, his attention to detail is masterful and his approach to architectural elements are unique. You need a lifetime to digest every element. above all, he was exceptionally skillful in knowing how to combine a base material with a precious one.

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    Design Works

    • Tomba Brion Photo by Ake Eson Lindman

      Carlo Scarpa's Tomba Brion is an evocative meditation on life and death. Tombs are built in memory of those buried below, but they can also be places of more general reflection. In a cemetery in a remote village, toward the foothills of the Dolomites, Carlo Scarpa built a poetic mausoleum that anyone entering it could communicate with.
    • Tomba Brion Photo by Christian Moller Andersen

      Carlo Scarpa's Tomba Brion is an evocative meditation on life and death. Tombs are built in memory of those buried below, but they can also be places of more general reflection. In a cemetery in a remote village, toward the foothills of the Dolomites, Carlo Scarpa built a poetic mausoleum that anyone entering it could communicate with.
    • Tomba Brion Photo by Federico Covre

      Carlo Scarpa's Tomba Brion is an evocative meditation on life and death. Tombs are built in memory of those buried below, but they can also be places of more general reflection. In a cemetery in a remote village, toward the foothills of the Dolomites, Carlo Scarpa built a poetic mausoleum that anyone entering it could communicate with.
    • Tomba Brion Photo by Ivo Stani

      Carlo Scarpa's Tomba Brion is an evocative meditation on life and death. Tombs are built in memory of those buried below, but they can also be places of more general reflection. In a cemetery in a remote village, toward the foothills of the Dolomites, Carlo Scarpa built a poetic mausoleum that anyone entering it could communicate with.
    • Tomba Brion Photo by Jacopo Famularo

      Carlo Scarpa's Tomba Brion is an evocative meditation on life and death. Tombs are built in memory of those buried below, but they can also be places of more general reflection. In a cemetery in a remote village, toward the foothills of the Dolomites, Carlo Scarpa built a poetic mausoleum that anyone entering it could communicate with.
    • Villa Ottolenghi

      Villa Ottolenghi was designed by Carlo Scarpa in 1978. Master builder Lloyd Wright said: "You can't park on the ground, you have to park on the ground." The words echoed so deeply in Scarpa's mind that he inspired Villa Ottolenghi. Located in Bardolino on the eastern bank of Lake Garda, the 1974 building looks like an ancient ruin, "a piece of land from the ground itself, with its roof terrace stretching out over the lake".
    • Castelvecchio

      The castle museum Castelvecchio by Carlos Capa in Verona, Italy, in 1974. The renovation of the Castle museum is one of Italy's national treasure architect Carlo Scarpa's acclaimed masterpieces. He worked on the project from 1957 to 1975. In terms of how to deal with the relationship between the original history of the building and the transformation, the design of the structure, the use of materials and other aspects, the castle Museum is undoubtedly the most wonderful answer given by Scarpa in his career. What is more memorable is that the museum exhibits an exhibition so in keeping with the architectural atmosphere that it still looks as pioneering and classic as it did when it opened in 1964. Since its completion, the Castle Museum has been an enduring source of inspiration for architects, interior designers and exhibition designers around the world.
    • Museo Di Castelvecchio

      It is worth mentioning that, in terms of the history of architecture, the strong castle that symbolises and characterizes the town can only be changed in the near future, compared with the long span of history. Licisco Magagnato contacted Carlo Scarpa in 1958 for a temporary exhibition. The synergy between the former partisan, political warrior, art historian and professor Venice continued at various stages until the museum opened in 1964. Scarpa's intervention, as a vast intermediary between the old entity and the renovation, was designed to calibrate a new museum based on the ideas of modern Museographic museums, with a slow and intimate visiting experience.
    • Showroom Gavina

      In 1961, architect Carlo Scarpa was commissioned by Dino Gavina to open a shop in the historic centre of Bologna, Italy. The solution designed by Scarpa, whose facade is a huge concrete slab pierced by large circular Windows, has become one of the most unique places in the urban landscape, sparking fierce debate in the name of preserving and respecting the ancient city. It has long been a destination for tourists from all over the world, and today one can calmly acknowledge it as a cornerstone of contemporary Italian architecture. To Gavina's credit, she has identified architecture as an effective and necessary way for her modern art activities to establish a positive cultural relationship with the city.
    • Fondazione Querini Stampalia

      In 1963, is located in Venice, Italy, led by carlo scarpa's precious architectural works are seen as "the 20th century's most culture and noble customs Italian construction ideal", but it involves only one of the original entry and the internal courtyard of palace: architectural treasures and poetry, is embedded with the prestigious, extreme decline, and complex. The restoration of the building consists of four parts: the bridge is the lightest and fastest crossing arch made in Venice in the past centuries, the entrance is a barrier against high water, the portico (arcades) and the gardens.
    • Negozio Olivetti Photo by Marco Introini

      The ingenuity of the great architect Carlo Scarpa was the driving force behind this architectural masterpiece of the 20th century. After years of abandonment, this building in Venice, Italy, has reopened its Spaces, which were carefully designed and built by skilled artisans. In 1957, Adriano Olivetti determined that there was a place for representation in an environment that respected the historical context of modernity and innovation. The work was entrusted to The Venetian Carlo Scarpa, who reorganized the original dark, narrow space with a unified overall design and a genius, innovative spatial structure to restore volume, enhance potential transparency, and engage in dialogue with decorative elements.
    • Negozio Olivetti

      The ingenuity of the great architect Carlo Scarpa was the driving force behind this architectural masterpiece of the 20th century. After years of abandonment, this building in Venice, Italy, has reopened its Spaces, which were carefully designed and built by skilled artisans. In 1957, Adriano Olivetti determined that there was a place for representation in an environment that respected the historical context of modernity and innovation. The work was entrusted to The Venetian Carlo Scarpa, who reorganized the original dark, narrow space with a unified overall design and a genius, innovative spatial structure to restore volume, enhance potential transparency, and engage in dialogue with decorative elements.
    • Negozio Olivetti Photo by Xavier de Jaureguiberry

      The ingenuity of the great architect Carlo Scarpa was the driving force behind this architectural masterpiece of the 20th century. After years of abandonment, this building in Venice, Italy, has reopened its Spaces, which were carefully designed and built by skilled artisans. In 1957, Adriano Olivetti determined that there was a place for representation in an environment that respected the historical context of modernity and innovation. The work was entrusted to The Venetian Carlo Scarpa, who reorganized the original dark, narrow space with a unified overall design and a genius, innovative spatial structure to restore volume, enhance potential transparency, and engage in dialogue with decorative elements.
    • Gipsoteca Canoviana

      The museum was designed by Francesco Lazzari in 1836 and expanded by Carlo Scarpa in 1957. The building recreates the artwork setting in the artist's studio. Construction began in 1834 under the direction of Giovanno Zardo and was completed in 1836. In 1844 Pasino Tonin, Gipsoteca Canoviana's first curator, completed an elaborate restoration of the sculptures, culminating in the installation.
    • Venezuela Pavilion

      Designed by Italian architect Carlo Scarpa in 1954, the Venezuela Pavilion is located in Giardini di Castello in Venice, Italy, which reopened after restoration in May 2016. Many visitors to the Venice Biennale pass by the building and do not notice its architectural style. Those who notice this may not know it, but this is an early design by Carlo Scarpa, and one of the few new independent buildings, rather than renovating, transforming, or adding to a historic building.
    • Palazzo Abatellis

      The Palazzo Abatellis, also known as Palazzo Patella is a palace located in the Kalsa district of southern Italy. It is home to Galleria Della Sicilia, the Sicilian region's art gallery. The palace is a model of Gothic Catalan architecture, designed by Matteo Carnelivari in the 15th century when he worked in Palazzo Aiutamicristo in Palermo. It was the residence of Francesco Abatellis, or Patella, the port authority of the Kingdom of Sicily.
    • La Chiesa Al Villaggio

      Carlo Alberto Scarpa designed the church in Borca di Cadore, Italy, in collaboration with Studio Gellner. Edoardo Gellner writes: "From the very beginning of the city's planning, the church was placed in a dominant position in the residential area as a terminus for pedestrian routes linking the buildings in the city centre. The architectural form of the hut with a steep 60 degrees underground, similar to the core pavilion of Cologne (45 degrees), emphasizes the building's function and the surrounding establishment of a bottom-up spatial scale symbolizing the landscape, visible to the exterior and interior points of the village. The building is unique in its daylight clock castle and its 68-meter-high spire. Due to poor function or inopportune, a small outdoor church was set up near the entrance. In the plan, the slight plan makes the church slightly asymmetrical and connects the lower Baptist church to the left side of the altar and the cut pyramid of the bell tower to the central body, which includes the choir, the Hallows room and some technical rooms.
    • Giardino Delle Sculture

      Scarpa's work as a designer has been narrowly framed as that of an object–fixated architect. His fascination with rich materials, overly complex details, and often arcane references has overshadowed other aspects of his productive activities. Yet, there is another Scarpa who has yet to be fully explored. Landscape and garden art were intrinsic parts of Scarpa's productive activities, informing his choice of materials, the nature of his details, and the meaning of his references.