YINJISPACE use media professional’s unique perspective,try to explore the essence of life behind the design works.

© logo 粤ICP备19077098号

YINJISPACE use media professional’s unique perspective,try to explore the essence of life behind the design works.

© logo 粤ICP备19077098号
Mexican

Luis Barragán(1902-1988)

We honor Luis Barragán for his commitment to architecture as a sublime act of poetic imagination. He has created gardens, squares and fountains of enchanting beauty, metaphysical landscapes to enjoy meditation and company.

Luis Barragán Morfín was born in Guadalajara, Jalisco on March 9, 1902. Although he came from a well-positioned family, his instinct was, above all his comforts, that led him to enter the world of design and architecture. After receiving a bachelor's degree in engineering in 1924, he traveled all over Europe. His later design concepts were deeply influenced by Moorish architecture in southern Spain, native Mediterranean architecture, Ferdinand Baker's garden, Frederick Kessler's theory, and Le Corbusier's works and theories. The Mexican was chosen in 1980 as its second winner, making it the first Latin American on the list.

Barragán's early works adopted an international style. However, the various ideas inspired by the trip to Europe and its own Mexican "nativeism" formed a personal design style. In addition, Barragán tried to create an architectural style that preserves the roots of local art while being inspired by national artworks, while also pursuing spiritual beauty and harmony with nature. He strives to reproduce the tranquility and beauty of the childhood environment through the interpretation of the romanticism of landscape architecture.

Unlike his contemporary architects, Barragán was loyal to the theory of painter and landscape architect Ferdinand Baker, and regarded the garden as a magical environment. Thick walls, small exits, bright colors, and the use of natural materials are the characteristics of Barragán's mature works. The success of his later works is mainly due to the beautiful reflection of sunlight and water. Luis Barragán died on November 22, 1988 due to Parkinson's disease, his remains were wrapped in the Mexican flag and veiled in the central hall of the National Institute of Fine Arts.

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    Design Works

    • Casa Pedregal

      When modernist architect Luis Barragan and his friends began hiking in Mexico City's El Pedregal region, their bodies must have stumbled, twisted, and scratched on the hard, uneven, jagged, sharply-textured lava floor. In the early 1940s, it was an area untouched by urban development and had a colonial history to some extent -- because it was uninhabitable. Undeterred by this recreational abuse, however, Barragan envisioned a residential community -- an architectural project that aspired to combine urbanization and ecosystem conservation. Designed and built between 1947 and 1950, one of the earliest houses was the Casa Pedregal.
    • Cuadra San Cristobal Photo by Kevin Scott

      Luis Barragán loves horses and met Egerström while riding at the nearby club hípico francés, both shared a passion for the equestrian life. In 1964, entrusted by Egerström, he designed an equestrian stadium near Mexico City for breeding and training of thoroughbreds. The project that Luis Barragán, in collaboration with Andrés Casillas, designed in 1966 and built between 1967 and 1968 for Swedish-born Folke S. Egerström (1921-2002) and his family captures the atmosphere of a palazzo with its main house, a two-bedroom guesthouse, stables, and two L-shaped swimming pools: one for people and one for horses.
    • Cuadra San Cristobal Photo by Luis Gallardo

      Luis Barragán loves horses and met Egerström while riding at the nearby club hípico francés, both shared a passion for the equestrian life. In 1964, entrusted by Egerström, he designed an equestrian stadium near Mexico City for breeding and training of thoroughbreds. The project that Luis Barragán, in collaboration with Andrés Casillas, designed in 1966 and built between 1967 and 1968 for Swedish-born Folke S. Egerström (1921-2002) and his family captures the atmosphere of a palazzo with its main house, a two-bedroom guesthouse, stables, and two L-shaped swimming pools: one for people and one for horses.
    • Casa Gilardi

      The facade of Casa Gilardi House was designed by architect Luis Barragan for a pair of single friends, Mark English and Pancho Gilardi. Mark English recalls the first time he saw the building. "We arrived at the house, which is located in an understated, typical Latin American neighborhood and is characterized by two - and three-story sheltered facades.